James Crisp

Coding, calisthenics, book reviews, mind hacks and the occasional personal bit.

Category: Brewing

Ginger Beer Recipe

Ginger Beer BottlesHome made ginger beer is awesome, and not hard to do at all. It takes a few hours to prepare all the ingredients, then several days fermentation, then another hour or two for bottling. Usually I make about 8 or 9 1L bottles of ginger beer in a batch, and I like to make it less sweet than the commercial stuff. It is slightly alcoholic (1-2% approximately) and has a really nice gingery bite the goes well with pizza, spicy food or just about anything else! I use a recipe adapted from the Ye Olde Ginger Beer Recipe. It is as follows:

Ingredients

  • 4 lemons
  • 900g sugar
  • 9L of water (enough to fill a demi-john)
  • 1 packet / 2 teaspoons of Ale yeast (you can use bread yeast if you’re desperate)
  • 200g fresh root ginger
  • 4 heaped tea spoons of tartaric acid (Cream of Tartar)

Equipment
Carboy

  • A large pot that can boil four litres of water
  • A jug
  • A glass
  • A coarse cheese grater
  • A wooden spoon
  • 10L carboy (10L water container does nicely) washed & sterilized with bleach
  • A bubble seal for the carboy
  • A lemon juicer
  • A lemon zester / fine grater
  • A fine sieve
  • 9 X 1.25 litre soft drink bottles, empty, washed & sterilized with bleach

Method

1. Fill pot with water and put on to boil

2. While the water is coming to the boil…

  • scrape the zest from one of the lemons
  • grate the ginger on the coarse cheese grater
  • add the sugar to the ginger and lemon zest in a bowl
  • cut the lemons in half and squeeze the juice into the jug
  • add the tartaric acid to the lemon juice
  • put the yeast into some warm water with a little sugar in a glass

3. When the water has boiled ….

  • add the sugar, ginger and lemon zest to the water, turn off the heat and
    stir
  • allow the water to cool to roughly blood heat, stirring occasionally
  • add the lemon juice and tartaric acid to the water
  • add the yeast mixture

Carboy with bubble seal

4. Use the jug to pour the mixture into the carboy and top up to 9L with boiled water (cooled to blood temperature)

5. Seal the demijohn with the bubble seal (I use salt in the water to sterilize the seal)

6. Stand the demijohn in a warm place for 48 hrs or for several days in a cool place

7. After 48 hrs pour the mixture through the sieve into the jug and fill the bottles leaving an air gap for the pressure to build up in (1L into each bottle). Screw the caps tightly onto the bottles

8. Leave the bottles at room temperature for 24 hrs (to generate the C02 fizz)

9. Put the bottles in the fridge for 2-3 days to allow the yeast to settle

10. Drink and enjoy 🙂

Notes
If you ferment the mixture in the carboy for longer before bottling, it will be less sweet and more alcoholic.

Mango Liqueur – Fruition

The mango liqueur started about a month ago has now reached fruition. After filtering with cheese cloth, and adding a little sugar (much less than a cup), it is quite tasty. It should improve further as it ages over the next month or so, assuming it lasts that long 🙂

Mango Liqueur

Started a quick mango liqueur this evening. Two large fresh mangoes worth of pulp (approx 500ml) mixed with 500ml of vodka in a jar. Planning to shake every few days for the next few weeks, filter and then add about 1 cup of sugar, before maturing for a few months. I have high hopes, as a similar recipe worked well with bananas in the past.

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